Indians, Mexicans battle to preserve traditional spice mix

Mexican-Americans, who comprise a majority of the United States’ Mexican-American population, are in a fight to preserve a spice blend that has been in use in the United Kingdom for more than a century.

“We’re here to defend our culture, not to be forced to do what’s right for another group of people,” said Jose Guadalupe, an agro-chemist and member of the San Diego-based Food and Agriculture Organization of San Diego.

The spice blend known as marjoramas is said to have helped pioneer the Mexican food culture and has long been used by Mexican immigrants and descendants.

The mix is made from dried ground corn and beans and includes spices including pepper, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, coriander, turmeric and coriagen, said Tom Hochberg, who runs a spice-making business in San Diego that makes the spice mix.

He said the mix is used in Mexican restaurants and in many Mexican homes, as well as in specialty restaurants and Mexican markets.”

You can make marjors from corn or beans, it’s just a different type of spice.”

He said the mix is used in Mexican restaurants and in many Mexican homes, as well as in specialty restaurants and Mexican markets.

It has become popular among people in San Jose and in California, where it has become an instant favorite among many in their 50s and 60s, said Hochburger.

It was also popular in the 1930s, when the spice blends were sold by a local grocer.

He said that it is considered a good food by many because it doesn’t taste like food.

“I think it’s a good idea for people to try it,” Hockley said.

Hochberg said his family had a lot of spice growing up and had the mix as a way to use up any leftover ingredients that they didn’t want to waste.

He doesn’t sell the mix anymore, but he still makes it in his business.

Hockley, who is a San Jose resident, said the spice blend is a cultural relic that is still used by many in Mexico and Central America.

“I think the culture is going to continue to be preserved,” Hocking said.

“It’s part of the fabric of our society, the Mexican American identity.

If it were just a thing that was imported to America and was a product that was made locally, I don’t think it would be a problem,” Hocher said.